Is your game lacking some key shots?  Perhaps the simplest solution is to have your clubs re-gripped.  Our knowledgeable staff can help with the decision making and proper grip choice for your game.

GOLF CLUB REGRIPPING

Lakeshore offers a range of quality grips.  Ozone, heat, dirt, and oils from your hands all age your grips and cause damage.   Grips that are the wrong size, worn out or that aren’t suited for weather conditions can all negatively impact your game. We recommend having your clubs re-gripped once a year or every 30 – 40 rounds depending on how much time you spend on the practice range.

A good grip can improve comfort, consistency and shot distance. You can personalize your grip type, size, color and material to get one that best suits your hands.

A grip should always be replaced if you notice any of the following signs…

• smooth hard surfaces

• cracks

• shiny patches

• worn spots

• loss of tack

GOLF CLUB RESHAFTING

Broken shafts happen and whether it’s an accident or on purpose we can supply and fit shafts from all the main manufacturers. We can simply perform a straight replacement or perhaps recommend a new improved type of shaft that could lengthen your drivers.

We have a large assortment of grips in stock or one day custom ship.  

Stop in today to check out the selection.

ST. LOUIS — Brooks Koepka is a tough guy to miss. He’s the one with the million-dollar smile, steal-yo-girl biceps and the mightiest swing in golf. He’s built like Ben Watson, but he putts like Ben Crenshaw. The next time he’s rattled will be the first. He’s now won three of the past six majors he’s entered and joined some elite company in the three-major club (more on that in a minute).

And yet, despite all of that, I’m afraid somehow we have missed him.

Koepka held off — I can’t believe I’m typing these words — a 64 from Tiger Woods on Sunday at a major championship and hoisted yet another major trophy at the end of the week. After two bogeys in his first five holes, he played the final 13 flawlessly with five birdies and a closing 66 to win by two. All of this with Woods doing his thing ahead of him.

“You could hear the roars when we were on 10 and 11, and then you could kind of hear it trickle down as they changed the leaderboards all the way through,” said Koepka. “You could hear a different roar like every 30 seconds. So we knew what was going on. It’s pretty obvious when Tiger makes a birdie. I think everybody at the golf course cheers for him. I’m sure everyone is rooting for him.”

Tiger’s 64, though remarkable, wasn’t enough to catch Koepka. A 62 would have put him in a playoff. It would have taken a 61 from Big Cat for the outright win.

Brooks Koepka kind of flexed on Tiger Woods (of all people) on a Sunday at a major championship.

“I remember when I watched Adam win at the Players. I loved his golf swing. He’s got the best golf swing ever, I think. It’s so pretty to watch. He’s one of the nicest guys once you meet him, too. He really is,” Koepka said. “And then, I mean, Tiger for obvious reasons. As a kid growing up, that’s the whole reason that all of us, or people in my generation, are even playing golf was because of him. And to duel it out with them, it’s pretty neat. I don’t think I ever dreamed of that, that situation that I was in today.

“It really is surreal. It’s really cool.”

No category exists for a golfer whose four wins include three majors, all before his 30th birthday. We don’t know what to do with that. I’ll struggle to figure this out for the rest of 2018 and into 2019. It is irreconcilable that someone could win three of his first 20 major starts but only one of his first 80 non-major starts on the PGA Tour.

I suppose we should start with what we know:

  • Koepka has joined Woods, Jordan Spieth, Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus as the only Americans with three majors by the age of 28 since World War II.
  • Koepka has joined Woods, Nicklaus, Gene Sarazen and Ben Hogan as the only golfers to win the U.S. Open and PGA Championship in the same year.
  • Koepka joined Spieth and Rory McIlroy as the only golfers to win multiple majors in a single season over the past decade.
  • Koepka has won three of his past six majors and finished in the top 15 a stunning 11 (!) times at majors since 2014.

And he didn’t even play this year’s Masters because of an injury.

“Three majors at 28,” said Koepka. “It’s a cool feeling. It really is. You know, hopefully I can stay healthy. I’ve kind of had some trouble with that over the past two years, three years, whatever it was. Missed the British [Open] and then to miss Augusta. You know, I think I’m much more disciplined now, so I should be able to play every major, making sure my body’s healthy.”

Maybe for now we can think of Koepka the way baseball thought of John Smoltz. The former Braves pitcher was terrific in the regular season. A Hall of Fame pitcher. And he was even better in the playoffs. It’s easy to deride athletes who show up big in big moments but don’t perform when the chips are up. Why don’t you do that all time? Even they struggle to explain it.

“For some reason, I can really tune in in the majors, and I have no idea why,” said Koepka earlier in the week. “They really get my attention.”

Now he has our attention. Koepka wasn’t hard to miss before. He clubs the ball and picks off trophies — big ones, not middling ones or plates or medals. He collects. He has done so at an historical rate thus far, and now we’re staring at a bizarre scenario in which Koepka could legitimately win as many or more majors than he does normal PGA Tour events.

“I would think [my game] suits the majors, having won three of the last six I’ve played in. So I guess [it] suits them. Need to figure out Augusta a little bit, haven’t quite had the results there that I’ve had elsewhere. But this golf course set up beautifully for me,” Koepka said. “I’m looking forward to the next few years. If I can stay healthy and actually show up to a major, I feel like I’ve got a good chance.”

In some ways, this is fitting. Koepka’s game is as impossible as his resume. He pounds the horizon with his fists and then releases preposterous chip shots with the delicateness of a man half his size. It doesn’t compute that the man who led the PGA Championship in driving distance and finished second from tee to green would also finish top 20 in putting. That’s not a fluke, either. It’s who he is, and it’s a harbinger for what the future looks like, too.

“I’m excited for the next few years,” said Koepka. “As fans, like, I’m a fan of golf. You should be excited. I mean, Tiger’s come back. You look at what Dustin’s doing, Justin [Thomas], Rory, Spieth … I mean, it’s a great time to be a golf fan. I can’t wait to duel it out with them.”

SOURCE:  CBSSports

🏌️ OPEN TEE TIMES • ALL WEEKEND — We look forward to seeing you this weekend on the links with us!

Join us for our Thursday Night Men’s League at 5:30 pm and then again on Friday for Couples Night at 5:30 pm

Fun times at Timberlake!

ST. LOUIS — The PGA Championship is the year’s final major. But there’s still plenty to be decided in golf. Justin Thomas, who won Sunday at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational and is the defending PGA champion this week at Bellerive, has three wins. So do Dustin Johnson and Bubba Watson. Justin Rose and Jason Day, meanwhile, have two victories this season. The year’s first three major winners were Patrick Reed, Brooks Koepka and Francesco Molinari.

So, who will be the player of the year?

The Wanamaker Trophy is far more significant a prize, of course, but any of the aforementioned players hoisting it would be a defining mark on a tremendous season, and give said player a leg up on the honor.

Here’s a breakdown of the candidates so far.

Justin Thomas: Though his win Sunday was his first since February it came on a difficult Firestone course, much the way his previous victory took place on a tough PGA National course at the Honda Classic, which he won in a playoff over Luke List. Thomas’ other victory came last fall at the inaugural CJ Cup in Korea—also in a playoff, over Marc Leishman.

Dustin Johnson: His three wins came in Maui, Memphis and Canada. They also were the most impressive among the group in terms of margin of victory. Johnson won at Kapalua by eight, TPC Southwind by six and Glen Abbey by three. The top-ranked played in the world, he also has missed just one cut in 15 starts, has two runner-up finishes and two third-place finishes, and has finished in the top 10 a staggering 10 times in 15 starts. By comparison, Thomas has seven top-10s in three more starts.

Bubba Watson: Like Johnson, Watson’s victories came on a differing tracks with wins at Riviera and TPC River Highlands, bookended around his title at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play at Austin Country Club. Watson however has just two other top-10s.

Justin Rose: The WGC-HSBC Champions and Fort Worth Invitational were Rose’s two victories on the PGA Tour this season, but he also won in Turkey and Indonesia and rose to as high as No. 2 in the world before Thomas supplanted this past weekend. In 13 total starts in 2018, Rose has five top-10s.

Jason Day: If it seems like Day has barely played this year it’s because he has. The Aussie has made just a dozen starts but has won two of them, at Torrey Pines and Quail Hollow. He has just three other top-10 finishes, though.

In terms of major performance, Johnson and Rose have the better resumes. Johnson tied for 10th at the Masters and third at the U.S. Open, while Rose finished in the top 10 in both Opens, including a runner-up at Carnoustie.

But there’s still one more major to go.

SOURCE:  Golfworld

🏌️ OPEN TEE TIMES • ALL WEEKEND

National Friendship Day is Sunday but any day is a great day to spend enjoying a game of golf with your friends at Timberlake Golf Course.

Join us for our Thursday Night Men’s League at 5:30 pm and then again on Friday for Couples Night at 5:30 pm

Don’t forget to sign up for the Club Championship scheduled for August 11th & 12th.

Fun times at Timberlake!

4 Person Best Ball

EACH TWO PERSON TEAM DRAWS FOR THE TEAM THEY PLAY

starts 5:30 pm

Every Monday Night

Ready to play golf?  Online booking!

August 11th & 12th

Play anytime before 3 pm on August 11th (must have witness with you)

Tee times on Sunday morning will be in your flight

Championship Flight will play from BLUE TEES on Sunday

 

Must be a Full Member or Anniversary Member to participate

$45 entry

includes 18 holes of golf both days and prizes

*Full Members with Cart Pass pay only $15

• Men’s Division •

• Men’s Senior Division (60 +) •

• Women’s Division •

TWO DAY COMBINED SCORE

We look forward to seeing you!

contact the pro shop to register

217-797-6496

OPEN TEE TIMES ALL WEEKEND

Join us for our Thursday Night Men’s League at 5:30 pm and

then again on Friday for Couples Night at 5:30 pm

Fun times at Timberlake!

Still looking to make sense of the madness that took place Sunday afternoon at Carnoustie? Here are a few significant digits (metric system, this week) that you’re welcome to borrow the rest of the week.

— Number of bogeys Francesco Molinari made in his final 37 holes, nearly unthinkable given the pitfalls that await during every trip ’round Carnoustie, among the hardest links courses in the world.

— Number of Italian major champions as of 6:53 p.m. in Carnoustie, the moment Molinari officially became the British Open champion.

— Finishing position of Rory McIlroy, who put on a late charge after a rough Sunday start. It was the first major championship runner-up finish of McIlroy’s career

2.5 — Number of years Molinari plans to play until retirement, according to a hilarious list compiled by fellow Tour pro Wesley Bryan.

— Number of top-five finishes in Molinari’s last six starts; wins at the BMW Championship and Quicken Loans National plus runner-up finishes at the John Deere and the Italian Open had him red-hot entering this week.

 

— Players tied for the lead at one point during a rollicking back nine

— Number of different players that held a share of the lead on Sunday.

15 — Number of birdies made by Sam Locke, the 19-year-old Scottish amateur golfer (and professional barista). Only nine players made more birdies than Locke, who earned low am honors but was undone with a back-nine 42 on Sunday and slipped to a share of 75th.

27 — Number of players who finished under par for the week, up from 2007 at Carnoustie (19) and way up from 1999 (0).

30 — Spots that Eddie Pepperell jumped on Sunday after a final-round 67 left him as the early clubhouse leader despite being, as he said, “a little hungover.”

35 — Molinari’s age; he’s the youngest major winner since Sergio Garcia at the 2017 Masters and continues a trend of older British Open winners. Only three Open winners have been 32 or younger since 2007.

50 — Tiger Woods’s projected World Ranking after finishing T6; good enough to qualify for the WGC-Bridgestone in two weeks.

82 — The highest score of Sunday’s final round belonged to Zander Lombard, a relatively unknown South African who fell from the edge of contention to a share of 67th after a 40-42 effort on Sunday. His was the only final-round score in the 80s.

SOURCE:  GOLF

Who wouldn’t like to play Timberlake this weekend?

Still a few open tee times available so get them while you still can.

For the best rates and times, Book Online!