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Tommy Fleetwood is one of the best iron players in golf, and earlier this week he shared a drill that could improve your ball-striking, too.

Fleetwood’s road to the top of the sport wasn’t smooth sailing. After turning professional in 2010 the 27 year-old steadily improved and finally cracked the top 50 in the Official World Golf Rankings in 2015. A year later, his game imploded, and his OWGR cratered to outside the top 180.

So, Fleetwood made some changes.

He reunited with his former swing coach and employed his best friend as his caddie, and slowly clawed his way back. Today, he ranks 11th in the Official World Golf Ranking, was among the heroes of the victorious 2018 European Ryder Cup team, and is cementing himself as one of the game’s best players.

Fleetwood’s comeback was built largely on the back of his ball-striking — he ranked 14th and 17th in Strokes Gained: Off The Tee and SG: Tee-to-Green on the PGA Tour last season. Speaking to Sky Sports during the British Masters this week, it was the “windmill” drills that eventually proved the difference.

You can hear him talking about it below…

The best thing about this drill is that it’s really simple. As Fleetwood demonstrates, you simply take your golf posture with your arms straight. Then, hit shots focusing on keeping your arms straight.

Tommy Fleetwood demonstrating the windmill drill

You only need to hit half-shots — no swings big enough that it will force your wrists to break. The goal of the drill is to stop your hands from working independently of your body rotation. Everything’s synched up, working together, and the face remains square as a result. It’s something Fleetwood does extremely well in his swing, and it’s an easy way to improve your game, too.

It is a great weekend to play golf at Timberlake!  There are open tee times starting Friday thru Sunday.

Book online for the best rates and times.   Don’t forget you can refer a friend when booking!

It’s Ryder Cup Time!

USA vs. EUROPE

This once every two year competition pairs up the best of the best from the USA and Europe.

Are your ready for an exciting weekend in golf?

Here are the first four matches…

Match 1 (2:10 a.m.):   Tony Finau and Brooks Koepka vs. Justin Rose and Jon Rahm
Match 2 (2:25 a.m.):   Rickie Fowler and Dustin Johnson vs. Rory McIlroy and Thorbjorn Olesen
Match 3 (2:40 a.m.):   Jordan Spieth and Justin Thomas vs. Paul Casey and Tyrrell Hatton
Match 4 (2:55 a.m.):   Tiger Woods and Patrick Reed vs. Francesco Molinari and Tommy Fleetwood.

Share your favorite RYDER CUP memory

 

The comeback is complete: Tiger Woods is a winner once again.

Woods picked up his 80th career PGA Tour victory but first since 2013 on Sunday, shooting a one-over 71 to finish at 11 under and win the Tour Championship by two shots over Billy Horschel.

With the victory, Woods will finish second in the FedEx Cup standings behind world No. 1 Justin Rose, who birdied 18 to finish in a tie for fourth and win the $10 million Cup grand prize. Woods will receive $3 million for second place in the season-long points race.

The win puts an exclamation point on what has been a remarkable comeback from Woods, who had spinal fusion surgery last April and was arrested for DUI with five drugs in his system one month later. Roughly this time last year, Woods said at the Presidents Cup that he wasn’t sure if he’d ever compete on Tour again. Now he has picked up a win in the final event of the season and will move into the top 15 in the world rankings on Monday.

“I had a hard time not crying on the last hole,” Woods said after the round.

https://twitter.com/PGATOUR/status/1043983162336935936

“I just can’t believe I pulled this off,” he said while fighting back tears at the trophy ceremony. “It’s been tough. Not so easy the last couple years. I’ve worked my way back, and I couldn’t have done it without the help of everyone around me.”

Woods started the day with a three-shot lead over Rose and Rory McIlroy, the latter of whom fell out of contention while playing alongside Woods on Sunday. He birdied the first hole and pushed his lead to five on the front nine by finding fairways and greens and shooting a one-under 34 on the front nine.

After a birdie on 13, Woods had a five-shot lead with just five to play, but he would bogey 15 and 16, and his advantage shrunk to two. Woods got up-and-down for par on 17 to preserve the two-shot lead coming to the par-5 18th, and the win was virtually clinched when he smashed a drive right down the center at the finishing hole.

As he walked up the green after knocking his second into a greenside bunker, scores of fans followed right behind him in an iconic spectacle.

Woods then blasted out to six feet and two-putted to seal his first win in 1,876 days. He paused for a moment after sinking the final putt before raising his arms in triumph.

Below is a hole-by-hole recap of the round, including highlights and analysis.

HOLE 18, PAR 5 – PAR, +1 FOR DAY, -11 FOR TOURNAMENT

Woods is a winner again! He split the fairway with his drive and let out a big smile after that. He would knock his second into a greenside bunker, blasted out to six feet and two-putted for the win.

HOLE 17, PAR 4 – PAR, +1 FOR DAY, -11 FOR TOURNAMENT

Absolutely massive par save. Tiger missed left with a 3-wood again and hacked a wedge over the green. He was fortunate to find some trampled-down rough and played a nice chip to about four feet. Dead-center with the par effort and he’ll head to 18 needing a bogey or better for the win.

HOLE 16, PAR 4 – BOGEY, +1 FOR DAY, -11 FOR TOURNAMENT

Well, this is getting more interesting than Woods would like. He tugged a 3-wood into thick rough and opted to hack it out with a wedge and try to make par the hard way. His third was on line but landed long and was fortunate to spin back out of the thick stuff onto the fringe. His par effort wouldn’t go and it’s his second straight bogey, and now the lead is down to two with two to play.

HOLE 15, PAR 3 – BOGEY, E FOR DAY, -12 FOR TOURNAMENT

Really lucky not to find the water, as he missed short and right of the par 3. That could have been wet for the same price. He drew a good lie in the rough, however, and was able to play a bump-and-run to about nine feet. Couldn’t get the par putt to fall and the lead is down to three, as Billy Horschel has posted nine under.

HOLE 14, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

The 14th is the longest par 4 on the course at roughly 530 yards, so it’s absolutely imperative to hit the fairway if you’re going to make par. Woods did exactly that, peeling a cut that found the right side of the short grass. From there he hit a laser long iron to about 15 feet before the putt went begging by on the left side. Stress-free pars will suffice right now.

HOLE 13, PAR 4 – BIRDIE, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

A textbook birdie: driver down the center, wedge to 13 feet and a putt right in the middle of the cup. The lead is now back up to five—Billy Horschel is in second at eight under—and this tournament is very much his to lose.

HOLE 12, PAR 4 – PAR, E FOR DAY, -12 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger found the fairway with a cut 3-wood and hit a nice wedge to about eight feet, but the birdie effort wasn’t his best. It was left to right and he didn’t give it enough pace, missing on the low side.

It’s a bit of a missed opportunity, but six more pars will mean win No. 80.

HOLE 11, PAR 3 – PAR, E FOR DAY, -12 FOR TOURNAMENT

Just what he needed after the first bogey of the day. A really solid mid-iron into the middle of the par 3 green, which left a speedy putt down the hill. The birdie putt was left the whole way and rolled out to about three feet, but he brushed that in without incident. The lead is back to five after a Rose bogey.

HOLE 10, PAR 4 – BOGEY, E FOR DAY, -12 FOR TOURNAMENT

First bogey of the day comes after a wayward right drive forced Tiger to punch out with his second. The punch out rolled out a bit too far into the first cut and he didn’t judge the distance well on his third from 77 yards, hitting it 25 feet past the hole. Two putts from there and it’s his first dropped shot, and the lead is trimmed to four.

HOLE 9, PAR 3 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger hit a long-iron to the middle of the green on this 235-yard par 3. He liked that one and picked up the tee early. A nice effort from 35 feet rolls out to tap-in range, and that’s now eight straight pars after the opening birdie. His lead, which was three at the beginning of the day, is now 5. Nine more holes to go…

HOLE 8, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

There’s water all along the left side of 8, so it’s no surprise that Tiger bailed out right into a fairway bunker. He was able to get his second onto the front portion of the green and two putted from abouot 50 feet to keep the round bogey-free. Onward…

HOLE 7, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger continues to find fairways—he’s hit five of the first six—and hit an approach right at the flag, but it rolled out to about 20 feet past the hole. Another birdie effort that looked on line but finished about a foot short for another stress-free par.

Through seven holes, he’s been solid as can be: hitting fairways and greens and avoiding bogeys. Perfect gameplan when you have a big lead like this. It’s almost like he’s done this before…

HOLE 6, PAR 5 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Bit of a missed opportunity, especially after Tiger ripped one down the middle and had just 215 into the par 5. He pulled his second shot significantly, as he was aiming toward the center of the green but hit a smother hook long and a bit left of the flag. It nestled way down in rough and he basically chunked his third, leaving it on the fringe. He left his long birdie effort short and did well to hole a four-footer for par.

Pars aren’t going to hurt Tiger too much right now—his lead is still five—but he’d be the first to tell you that he’d expect himself to make birdie from where he was off the tee.

HOLE 5, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger spoke after yesterday’s round about how the rest of the field would have to come chase him, and that he could make it very difficult for them by keeping a clean card. He’s doing exactly that, finding yet another fairway and giving himself a good luck at birdie after hitting wedge to about 15 feet. The putt had a chance but missed just barely to the left, prompting a reaction of surprise. Another par with a par 5 coming up next.

HOLE 4, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Important par save after he missed the fairway to the right, drawing a gnarly lie in the Bermuda rough. He tried to muscle an iron from 170ish to the green but it came out dead, finding a bunker short and right of the green. It was about a 30-yard bunker shot and he splashed out to about 10 feet, then made his par effort after McIlroy missed a par putt of similar length. Really good save.

His lead remains four over Justin Rose, but he now holds a five-shot advantage over McIlroy.

HOLE 3, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger went with iron off the tee to play for position and executed it perfectly, finding the center of the short grass. From about 125 he went with sand wedge, flying it right over a front pin to about 20 feet. The pin was tucked right over a bunker, and both Woods and McIlroy played conservatively past the pin. It left a huge left-to-right breaker for birdie—like, 10 feet of break—and it ran out of steam short of the hole. No issues with the par putt and it’s a one-under start after three holes.

HOLE 2, PAR 3 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Iron to the center of the green on this 200-yard par 4, leaving about 40 feet for birdie. The putt was on line but finished a few rolls short, leaving a stress-free tap-in for par.

HOLE 1, PAR 4 – BIRDIE, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Ideal start. Tiger went with driver off the tee and picked up the tee really quickly as it was right down the center. His approach was right at the flag and finished just 10 feet from the hole. He walked in the birdie effort. Couple the birdie with McIlroy’s par and Tiger’s lead is now four.

Couldn’t have asked for a better start.

ATLANTA — One name clearly stood out on the star-packed leaderboard after Thursday’s first round of The Tour Championship.

Tiger Woods.

On a sweltering day at East Lake Golf Club, the game’s biggest draw ignited roars throughout his round, none bigger than the one that rocked the stately clubhouse a few yards away from the 18th green when he canned a 28-footer for eagle to join Rickie Fowler atop the leaderboard.

It capped a day of precision and control for the former world No. 1 who is 17 months removed from spinal fusion surgery, a day when he missed just four fairways and four greens in regulation, put his signature to a 5-under-par 65 and moved one day closer to win No. 80 and his first since 2013.

And Woods placed himself squarely in the mix to win his record third FedExCup and the $10 million bonus. So, too, did others, including Fowler, who birdied the last hole to gain a share of the lead.

In third at 66 are world No. 1 Justin Rose and Gary Woodland. Four-time major winner Rory McIlroy, defending FedExCup champion Justin Thomas and Tony Finau each shot 67. Jason Day, Jon Rahm and Paul Casey were in at 68. Brooks Koepka, the winner of the U.S. Open and PGA Championship this year, was at 69.

“I felt in control today,” said Woods, playing in the season finale for the first time since 2013. “I hit so many quality shots all day, whether it was tee to green or it was putts. The only hard part was getting my speed on the greens early. Once I figured out the pace of these things, it was all good.”

Yes, it was. He three-putted his first hole for bogey, then missed three consecutive birdie chances from inside 16 feet. Later he missed birdies from 10 and 11 feet, but other rolls for birdies found the bottom of the cup from 26 feet on 5, 15 feet at 6, four feet at 12 and seven feet at 14. He also made some clutch putts for par and finished with his 28-footer on the last.

“I played well today,” Woods said. “It wasn’t exactly the start I was looking for, but I made two good putts there at 5 and 6 and got to under par, and then from there I hit it pretty good, made a few putts.

“All in all, I had a lot of control today.”

It’s been that way for some time now for Woods, who earned a captain’s pick for the U.S. Ryder Cup team on the strength of six top-6 finishes in his comeback season, including a tie for sixth in the British Open and a second in the PGA. Then he tweaked his driver by switching shafts and adding loft to the face. He sacrificed distance but gained accuracy and confidence.

In his last start, he also shared the first-round lead after a 62 in the BMW Championship. He got within one shot of the lead in the final round and tied for fourth. Thus, upon arrival at East Lake, where he won in 2007 and finished second in 2009, Woods had this look about him, one that implied that after all his time battling injuries and conquering doubts that he’d never play again, this could finally be the week he wins again.

“I don’t want to say the difference with the driver has been night and day, but it’s been really good,” said Joe LaCava, Woods’ caddie. “For the most part, he’s standing on the tee knowing he’s going to hit the fairway instead of thinking he’ll hit the fairway. He’s hitting cuts with the driver and he’s hitting tight draws with the driver. He’s working the driver, and he’s shaping it nicely.

“So, if he hits more fairways, which he’s been doing, he’s going to give himself more chances, which he’s doing, because he’s the best modern-day iron player there’s ever been.”

In Friday’s second round, Woods will be paired with Fowler, who played many rounds with Woods when he first started his comeback.

“I remember there was a day we were up at the Medalist (in Florida) and we played 18, and I was going to go home and work out, and he went out to go play another nine,” Fowler said. “It’s been a while since we’ve been able to see him just go play for fun. He wanted to keep playing, so he kept playing.

“In my eyes, the biggest win for him is just staying healthy and being out here all year consistently. It’s obviously great for our sport. It’s great to have him as part of the (Ryder Cup) team next week. We hope he continues to play well. I just want to play a little bit better and beat him.”

SOURCE:  USAToday

Now that the Ryder Cup teams are set, it’s time for captains Jim Furyk and Thomas Bjorn to finalize who will pair with whom?

There’s a lot that goes into finding the perfect pairings in these team events. Captains must consider playing styles, personalities and a variety of other factors. And while everyone would be interested to see a Tiger Woods-Phil Mickelson pairing, that’s probably not the most effective option for the U.S.

Now, we understand that both Ryder Cup teams have plenty of resources to help them formulate the perfect combinations. But just in case the captains are looking for some extra advice, here’s our recommendations on which players should pair up in Paris, and why.

Brentley Romine

U.S.

Jordan Spieth-Patrick Reed: This is probably the easiest decision that Furyk has to make. This duo is 4-1-2 in the past two Ryder Cups, so even though Spieth might want to switch things up and partner with, say, Justin Thomas or Rickie Fowler, it’s best if he keeps his partnership with Reed. They are just too good together.

Tiger Woods-Bryson DeChambeau: While everyone on the U.S. team would love to pair with Woods, it seems as if DeChambeau, a three-time winner this season, will get the honor. The two have developed some chemistry this year through practice rounds and such. If there is anyone on the team as competitive as Woods, it’s DeChambeau, who had an excellent match-play record as an amateur, winning the 2015 U.S. Amateur and playing well for his country at the Walker Cup, Palmer Cup and World Amateur Team Championship.

Dustin Johnson-Brooks Koepka: The two gym buddies didn’t pair up until the final team session at Hazeltine. They lost to Rory McIlroy and Thomas Pieters in four-ball, 3 and 1, but showed some promise as a pairing. Johnson hasn’t played particularly well in Ryder Cups. Maybe competing alongside Koepka will spark something.

Phil Mickelson-Tony Finau: This will be Mickelson’s 12th straight Ryder Cup and at 48 years old, he doesn’t appear to have many more left as a player. He’s never won overseas, so he’ll be as motivated as ever to finally check that box off. Pairing him with the young and powerful Finau makes a lot of sense. The two played together at the Northern Trust a few weeks ago and Mickelson raved about Finau’s potential. Mickelson is also coming off a strong performance two years ago at Hazeltine, where he went 2-1-1.

Rickie Fowler-Justin Thomas: This is Thomas’ first Ryder Cup, but he isn’t the typical rookie, ranked fourth in the world and the defending PGA Tour Player of the Year. It’s no secret that he and Fowler are close, and their chemistry should produce results, especially in foursomes. They are similar players, possessing all-around games and gaining the most shots with their irons and putter.

Bubba Watson-Webb Simpson: This pairing worked very well in 2012 at Medinah, where the two went 2-1. They lost their opening session in 2014 and Simpson didn’t play again until singles. But Simpson is having his best season since 2012 – by a mile – and Watson, who has won three times this season, has regained some momentum of late. They could surprise in Paris.

EUROPE

Henrik Stenson-Justin Rose: Played three of four sessions together in 2016 – each of them opposite Spieth and Reed – and went 1-2, though their 5-and-4 Friday afternoon four-ball victory was mighty impressive. Also, they went 3-0 together at Gleneagles. This pairing is as safe a bet as any.

Rory McIlroy-Jon Rahm: McIlroy has seemed to embrace the role of taking a rookie under his wing after going 3-0 with Thomas Pieters at Hazeltine. Rahm is similar to Pieters on the course and McIlroy could help Rahm channel that passion into points.

Paul Casey-Tommy Fleetwood: Both players had some fun with the story of Fleetwood wanting to buy Casey’s extra set of Nike irons. And while it doesn’t look like Casey will loan the set to Fleetwood in Paris like he had joked about doing, the two Englishmen would make a nice pairing. Both are great iron players and similar personality types.

Ian Poulter-Tyrrell Hatton: Poulter’s great 2012 Ryder Cup showing came when he paired with Rose and McIlroy. However, after an 0-1-1 team performance in 2014 and not qualifying in 2016, Poulter likely needs a fresh partner. How about the fiery Hatton? The two teamed up to break a world record in a European Tour social video last year, and I could see Poulter as a perfect Ryder Cup role model for the emotional Hatton.

Alex Noren-Thorbjorn Olesen: I initially had Noren and Molinari teaming up, but felt that Sergio Garcia needed Molinari the most. Noren is a guy who could play with anyone. You never have to question his work ethic and though he and Olesen are rookies, they aren’t strangers to big moments. They also have similar games – Noren is a better driver of the golf ball, but they are pretty equal in other facets. Both putt it well, too.

Sergio Garcia-Francesco Molinari: Many of Garcia’s recent partners – Lee Westwood, Luke Donald, Martin Kaymer and Rafa Cabrera Bello – did not qualify. And while he paired with McIlroy three times in 2014, it seems as if McIlroy will again be tasked with motivating a rookie. Assuming that, it makes most sense to pair the struggling Garcia with a consistent presence like Molinari, who is a strong tee-to-green guy and proven on the Ryder Cup stage.

Kevin Casey

U.S.

Jordan Spieth-Patrick Reed: What, I’m going to suggest breaking up this pair?? In seven Ryder Cup matches as a duo, Spieth and Reed have lost once – when the opposing team made nine birdies in 14 holes, no less. We know how electric and efficient this pairing is. No need to overthink this one.

Tiger Woods-Brooks Koepka: Look, I’m in no way against the TW-Bryson pairing that the vast majority are pointing toward (see above). Clearly the duo has rapport. But part of Woods’ surprisingly mediocre Ryder Cup record outside of singles is that it’s long been difficult to find him a comfortable partner. Partners being some form of intimidated or awestruck has played a role in that, in my opinion. DeChambeau would probably fall in the awestruck category. But Koepka wouldn’t. The evidence is right there from last month when Brooks was unfazed by a charging Tiger and won the PGA Championship. Koepka and Woods clearly have rapport as well (See: post-round greeting at the PGA) and man would their power, steely demeanors and games make up an intimidating pair for any European squad to come up against. This seems like a winning team on swagger alone.

Bryson DeChambeau-Webb Simpson: This would be a pairing that could sneak up on the Europeans and lull them into a false sense of security. Neither player flashes with booming drives, but both are incredibly efficient. I especially like them as a foursomes pairing, as DeChambeau is a supreme ball-striker and Simpson boasts an excellent short game.

Dustin Johnson-Justin Thomas: Yes, I’m breaking up “the gym buddies” pairing of DJ and Koepka. But I don’t see this as controversial in the least considering that pairing lost 3 and 1 (and it could’ve been easily worse) in their only Ryder Cup grouping. They did go 2-0 together at the Presidents Cup, but these two don’t have any semblance of the Spieth-Reed dominance in its results. Substituting Thomas in here keeps this as a fierce pairing of huge power hitters, so the intimidation is still real. Just have a feeling, too, that DJ and JT could mesh well as partners.

Phil Mickelson-Tony Finau: Who better to pair a Ryder Cup rookie bursting with talent than Lefty? Mickelson certainly knows what it’s like to be a hotshot young gun and has vast Ryder Cup experience, so he could serve as an extremely useful advisor in this pairing. I also think these two have like temperaments in that they like to think and play aggressive. They should fuel off each other, and with both in good form that is very dangerous for any opponent.

Bubba Watson-Rickie Fowler: You want Watson to feel comfortable, and he should with a friend and cool customer in Fowler. This group would have great chemistry, and if both are on form there may not be a team in this event that makes as many birdies.

EUROPE

Henrik Stenson-Justin Rose: That pairing that defeated Reed and Spieth with nine birdies in 14 holes? That would be Stenson and Rose, who demolished the pair 5 and 4 in that 2016 match. Overall, they are 4-2 together in the last two Ryder Cups and are as reliable a pair as any outside Spieth/Reed.

Rory McIlroy-Ian Poulter: This pairing has gone 1-0-1 in Ryder Cup competition. That win, if you recall, was the one that catalyzed the Miracle at Medinah in 2012, as Poulter birdied the final five holes in a Saturday afternoon four-ball match to give him and McIlroy a comeback 1-up win, cut the deficit to 10-6 and energize the Euros. McIlroy has really embraced playing the Ryder Cup with an outpouring of emotion and starred doing so in 2016. It’d be tough to find a more perfect pairing in that regard.

Paul Casey-Tommy Fleetwood: This would be similar to Stenson and Rose in the all-reliable mold. Fleetwood may be a rookie, but he has shown he can quickly get on track on big stages. Casey obviously has plenty of previous pedigree. This is not a duo you can fall asleep on for one second.

Jon Rahm-Tyrrell Hatton: This is probably my riskiest pairing choice, but it has high potential. These are both highly emotional young stars who could build off each others’ histrionics in the charged Ryder Cup atmosphere. Of course, there’s also the chance their incredible combination of emotion could lead to combustion. But it’s the Ryder Cup, go big or go home.

Alex Noren-Francesco Molinari: On the other side, this is the mellow pairing. Both players are stoic, like to play precise golf and tend to sneak under the radar. Together they make a dangerous and dangerously overlooked pairing.

Sergio Garcia-Thorbjorn Olesen: Remember when Garcia was a young up and comer who dominated in the Ryder Cup thanks in part to his incredible energy? Probably a good idea to pair the struggling Masters champion with someone who can bring back memories of that youthful exuberance. Rahm is a good candidate here then, but I like Olesen a little better. Rahm can get a little hard on himself, whereas Olesen can better provide that uplifting youthful energy that can help elevate Garcia. You also need someone in form here considering Garcia’s struggles, and Olesen is certainly that as he has four top-12 finishes in his last six starts.

SOURCE:  MSN

 

Have you ever played night golf?  You really should try it!  Our night golf event is a daylight and nighttime event where you will play 9 holes in the daytime hours then stop for a delicious meal and head back out to complete your round during the night time hours.

Such a fun time, so don’t miss out!

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